…AND, ANOTHER LITTLE RANDOM ACT OF KINDNESS (Act 40)

Daffy Duck is back, and he brought along his rival and best pal Buggs Bunny this time!  The duck last visited our Sun City Peachtree bench on May 30th,

Now that you know quite a bit about Daffy, here’s the 4-1-1 on Buggs:

The carrot-chomping, white glove-wearing, gray and white rabbit is best known for his starring roles in the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated short films, produced by Warner Bros.  His debut dates back to 1940 in director Tex Avery’s Oscar-nominated film A Wild Hare.  Mel Blanc was the rabbit’s voice until 1989.

The buck-toothed trickster has quite the flippant personality, and he really doesn’t much care about anything or anybody.  Buggs is best known for his catch phrase, “Eh…What’s up, doc?”  It is, of course, asked in his typically aloof manner. 

Buggs is the master of disguise and can wear any get-up to confuse his enemies.  He fooled Taz, Elmer Fudd, and Yosemite Sam with his sexy female bunny disguise; however, Daffy wasn’t fooled at all by his pal.

Once in a while Buggs will upstage Porky Pig who typically brings Warner Bros. cartoons to a close by bursting through a drum and stuttering, “Th-Th-Th-That’s all, folks!”  Buggs, instead, will burst through the drum, munch on his carrot, and say in his Bronx-Brooklyn accent, “And dat’s de end!”

Buggs Bunny has become so popular that he has appeared in more films than any other cartoon character.  He even has his own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame!  In addition, the flippant rabbit has appeared in comics, video games, award shows, amusement park rides, and commercials.  Warner Bros. made the bunny their mascot as a result of all that fame.

This is one of my favorite Buggs Bunny quotes: “Don’t take life too seriously. You’ll never get out alive!”

…AND, ANOTHER LITTLE RANDOM ACT OF KINDNESS (Act 30)

First Sylvester, and now Elmer Fudd.  Poor Bugs Bunny can’t catch a break.  Elmer has made it his mission to hunt the rabbit down, and he’s at it again!  If it isn’t Daffy Duck he’s after, it’s Bugs; but, he always fails.

What usually ends up happening on Elmer’s hunting expeditions is that he ends up either injuring somebody else or himself—but, never Bugs Bunny.  Bugs is too crafty to let Elmer get the best of him.  Besides, if Elmer actually was faced with the prospect of succeeding, he would probably just let Bugs go anyway.  In the cartoon, Rabbit Fire, Bugs tricked Elmer into believing he had suceeded in killing Bugs, but Elmer showed great remorse.  As it turns out, Elmer is actually a vegetarian and just hunts for the sport of it.  (He also happens to be a billionaire and owns a yacht!)

Elmer sure has a way with words, Since his R’s and L’s sound like W’s, he says things like, “Be vewy, vewy quiet.  I’m hunting wabbits!”  His way of pronouncing words has become so popular that Google even includes “Elmer Fudd” as one of the novelty languages it will translate to in its search engine.

Late comedian and actor, Robin Williams, was so fond of Elmer Fudd’s pronunciation that he even sang Bruce Springsteen’s “Fire” in one of his sketches. 

Elmer became so famous that he popped up as a guest star on all sorts of TV shows, cartoons, and movies.  He was also mimicked in others, including TV show The Big Bang Theory.  In that show, there was a recurring character named Barry Kripkethat talked like Elmer Fudd.

Now that we have seen Elmer Fudd, Daffy Duck, and Sylvester, will Bugs Bunny be next to visit the bench?  Stay tuned!

…AND, ANOTHER LITTLE RANDOM ACT OF KINDNESS (Act 22)

Sylvester is on the prowl!  He looks quite fed up, too.  Tweety has escaped the feline’s claws with every attempt at capture, but the yellow canary always gets away.  I have to hand it to Granny’s proud cat, though; her whiskered pet never gives up. 

As I mentioned in my last post, Tweety always wins any battle with Sylvester James Pussycat, Sr., the Tuxedo cat who appears in the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of cartoons.  As a matter of fact, he appears in a lot of them– a whopping 103 Warner Bros. flicks.  Between 1945 and 1966, he was quite the popular cat on the screen. 

In addition to his attempts at making a meal of Tweety, Sylvester is best known for his sloppy lisp.  In the cartoon, Tweety, Tweety, Tweety, this exchange takes place between Tweety and Sylvester:

Tweety: “I wonder where that puddy tat went to?”  Sylvester [swinging on a wooden swing, flattened by a rock crusher]: “Does thith anthwer your question?”

About that name, “Sylvester,” is a pun on silvestris, the scientific name for the wild cat, the ancestor of domestic cats.

Interestingly, Sylvester’s many different cartoon directors put their own spin on the cat’s personality.  Friz Freleng is the one who directed Sylvester’s first appearance with Tweety in Tweety Pie; and it was the beginning of Sylvester’s desire to capture and munch on his little yellow-feathered enemy.   

When Bob Clampett got a hold of him in 1946’s, Kitty Kornered, Sylvester was one of Porky Pig’s pet cats and looked nothing like he does with Tweety.  He was voiced by Mel Blanc, though, so he sounded just like you remember.

Next up was Arthur Davis who gave Sylvester two completely different personalities.  In Doggone Cats, the feline was a trickster troublemaker who didn’t speak.  He spoke with a dopey voice, in Catch as Cats Can, though, and had a dopey personality to match. 

Robert McKimson paired Sylvester up with a silent baby kangaroo named “Hippity Hopper,” and then later with his son “Sylvester Junior,” where he unsuccessfully tried to raise the kitty to be a real cat.  Lastly, Sylvester and Speedy Gonzales were paired up together.

Finally, Chuck Jones put his spin on the black and white feline.  This is when he was paired up with Porky Pig in three horror-themed cartoons.

Looking back over Sylvester’s career, that cat really did have nine lives!  His appearance changed, his voice morphed, and his personality went in all sorts of directions.  That was one busy feline!